Classical Video Library

Of course the score is to be treated with the utmost respect, even reverence--it's the composer's message to us about how the music should sound. However, there are always questions, ambiguities, and mysteries that require us to look carefully at the small print in search for clues and solutions. We will look at several such cases in the 32 Beethoven sonatas, with some possible answers, or not!

"Can we change the score?": Some Dilemmas in the Beethoven Piano Sonatas

Peter Takács

Daniel Shapiro will discuss Beethoven's mighty "Hammerklavier" Sonata, Op. 106, perhaps his "magnum opus" for piano.  He will attempt to give a sense of the meaning and character of the work as a whole. He will also traverse the piece in some detail, sharing ideas about form and expression.  He will also give some suggestions for approach, study and practice.  It is strongly recommended that viewers have their own score of the work, with measure numbers, to following along with.

Beethoven Sonata No. 29, Op. 106 Q&A

Daniel Shapiro

Daniel Shapiro will discuss Beethoven's mighty "Hammerklavier" Sonata, Op. 106, perhaps his "magnum opus" for piano.  He will attempt to give a sense of the meaning and character of the work as a whole. He will also traverse the piece in some detail, sharing ideas about form and expression.  He will also give some suggestions for approach, study and practice.  It is strongly recommended that viewers have their own score of the work, with measure numbers, to following along with.

Beethoven Sonata No. 29, Op. 106, 2nd Movement

Daniel Shapiro

Daniel Shapiro will discuss Beethoven's mighty "Hammerklavier" Sonata, Op. 106, perhaps his "magnum opus" for piano.  He will attempt to give a sense of the meaning and character of the work as a whole. He will also traverse the piece in some detail, sharing ideas about form and expression.  He will also give some suggestions for approach, study and practice.  It is strongly recommended that viewers have their own score of the work, with measure numbers, to following along with.

Beethoven Sonata No. 29, Op. 106, 3rd Movement

Daniel Shapiro

Daniel Shapiro will discuss Beethoven's mighty "Hammerklavier" Sonata, Op. 106, perhaps his "magnum opus" for piano.  He will attempt to give a sense of the meaning and character of the work as a whole. He will also traverse the piece in some detail, sharing ideas about form and expression.  He will also give some suggestions for approach, study and practice.  It is strongly recommended that viewers have their own score of the work, with measure numbers, to following along with.

Beethoven Sonata No. 29, Op. 106, 4th Movement

Daniel Shapiro

"The early D major Sonata Op. 10 No. 3 was one of Beethoven's favorites. The 1st movement Presto bursts with energy, the Largo e mesto movement is profoundly expressive, presaging the drama in his opera "Fidelio."  The Menuetto emerges miraculously, like sunrise after a dark night. I call the rondo finale a "cat and mouse" movement, darting about playfully and unpredictably. Altogether a masterpiece of fresh inspiration."

Beethoven Sonata No. 3, Op. 10, 1st Movement

Peter Takács

"The early D major Sonata Op. 10 No. 3 was one of Beethoven's favorites. The 1st movement Presto bursts with energy, the Largo e mesto movement is profoundly expressive, presaging the drama in his opera "Fidelio."  The Menuetto emerges miraculously, like sunrise after a dark night. I call the rondo finale a "cat and mouse" movement, darting about playfully and unpredictably. Altogether a masterpiece of fresh inspiration.

Beethoven Editions Recommended by Peter Takascs 
1) Carl Czerny: On the Proper Performance of all Beethoven's Works for the Piano 
Composer: Carl Czerny 
Editor: Paul Badura-Skoda

2) Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas
Landmark Edition 
Editor: Barry Cooper
Publisher; ABRSM

3) Beethoven: Complete 35 Piano Sonatas
Publisher: Barenreiter
Editor: Jonathan Del Mar

4) Beethoven Piano Sonata: 
Editor: Bertha Antonia Wallner
Henle Urtext Edition
Bertha Antonia Wallner (Editor)
Conrad Hansen (Fingering)

Beethoven Sonata No. 3, Op. 10, 2nd Movement

Peter Takács

"The early D major Sonata Op. 10 No. 3 was one of Beethoven's favorites. The 1st movement Presto bursts with energy, the Largo e mesto movement is profoundly expressive, presaging the drama in his opera "Fidelio."  The Menuetto emerges miraculously, like sunrise after a dark night. I call the rondo finale a "cat and mouse" movement, darting about playfully and unpredictably. Altogether a masterpiece of fresh inspiration.

Beethoven Editions Recommended by Peter Takács
1) Carl Czerny: On the Proper Performance of all Beethoven's Works for the Piano 
Composer: Carl Czerny 
Editor: Paul Badura-Skoda

2) Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas
Landmark Edition 
Editor: Barry Cooper
Publisher; ABRSM

3) Beethoven: Complete 35 Piano Sonatas
Publisher: Barenreiter
Editor: Jonathan Del Mar

4) Beethoven Piano Sonata: 
Editor: Bertha Antonia Wallner
Henle Urtext Edition
Bertha Antonia Wallner (Editor)
Conrad Hansen (Fingering)

Beethoven Sonata No. 3, Op. 10, Editions and General Issues

Peter Takács

Beethoven started writing the first of his 32 sonatas (there are a few earlier ones not usually included) in 1795, and the very first one (Opus 2 No. 1) makes clear that this is not a work of either Haydn or Mozart — striking out in new dramatic directions and more expansive use of the keyboard.  But it is in the C minor Sonata, Opus 13, commonly called the “Pathetique”, that Beethoven announces himself to the world as a distinctly unique musical voice.  Furthermore, he composes in a way that brings the inter-relationship of thematic ideas to a previously unexplored level.   My discussion of the sonata will focus on the composition, the character, and the challenges to the performer.  I hope to leave the listener with a deeper understanding of the work, tips for performance, and ideas for practice.

Beethoven Sonata No. 8 “Pathetique” 1st Movement, Op.13

Victor Rosenbaum

Beethoven started writing the first of his 32 sonatas (there are a few earlier ones not usually included) in 1795, and the very first one (Opus 2 No. 1) makes clear that this is not a work of either Haydn or Mozart — striking out in new dramatic directions and more expansive use of the keyboard.  But it is in the C minor Sonata, Opus 13, commonly called the , that Beethoven announces himself to the world as a distinctly unique musical voice.  Furthermore, he composes in a way that brings the inter-relationship of thematic ideas to a previously unexplored level.   My discussion of the sonata will focus on the composition, the character, and the challenges to the performer.  I hope to leave the listener with a deeper understanding of the work, tips for performance, and ideas for practice.

Beethoven Sonata No. 8 “Pathetique” Op. 13, 2nd and 3rd Movement

Victor Rosenbaum

The Beethoven Sonata No. 22 in F Major, Op. 54 is the least played of all the 32 Beethoven Piano Sonatas! This should not be the case! It is quirky, funny, challenging, virtuosic, and absolutely unique, not to mention being a very useful Sonata to have in your repertoire. Let's take a look at this unusual two-movement 11 minute work, and see what makes it different from all other Beethoven Sonatas and how to communicate its humor to an audience. Beethoven himself loved this Sonata, so should you!

Beethoven Sonata Op. 54

Michael Lewin

Jonathan discusses many key considerations for learning, performing,  and teaching Beethoven Sonata Op. 81a, 3rd Movement

Beethoven Sonata in Eb Major, , Op. 81a, 3rd Movement

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan discusses many key considerations for learning, performing,  and teaching Beethoven Sonata Op. 81a, 2nd Movement

Beethoven Sonata in Eb Major, No. 26, Op. 81a, 2nd Movement

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan discusses many key considerations for learning, performing,  and teaching Beethoven Sonata Op. 81a, 1st Movement

Beethoven Sonata in in Eb Major, No. 26, Op. 81a, 1st Movement

Jonathan Bass

Daniel Shapiro will discuss Beethoven's mighty "Hammerklavier" Sonata, Op. 106, perhaps his "magnum opus" for piano.  He will attempt to give a sense of the meaning and character of the work as a whole. He will also traverse the piece in some detail, sharing ideas about form and expression.  He will also give some suggestions for approach, study and practice.  It is strongly recommended that viewers have their own score of the work, with measure numbers, to following along with.

Beethoven's Sonatas No. 29 in B-flat Major, Op. 106, 1st Movement

Daniel Shapiro

Piano students receive their first sonatinas and sonatas with great excitement. For teachers as well, this is a big step into the advancing repertoire for pianists. In this session we will explore how character, emotion, mood, and drama help make these pieces come alive. We will also discuss the role that technical preparation, form, theory, and stylistic concerns can enhance the enjoyment and understanding of these important classical works. Teaching and performing works from Duncombe and Attwood, to those of Clementi, Kuhlau, Diabelli, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven will be discussed and demonstrated.

Bringing Sonatinas & Sonatas to Life

Phyllis Lehrer

Schubert and the World of Lieder by Daniel Shapiro
Part I. Introduction:  Schubert's Lieder, and Lieder singers

Introduction: Schubert's Lieder and Lieder Singers

Daniel Shapiro

The course will focus on details of Mozart’s notation and its meaning in performance, the sources of characterization in his music, and the idiomatic performance of repeated sections with reference to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s Sonatas with varied reprises.

Performing Mozart: Understanding His language and the Role of Creativity in Interpretation

Robert Levin

Schubert and the World of Lieder by Daniel Shapiro
Part III.  Looking at other compositions through the "lens" of the song-world

Schubert: Looking at Other Compositions Through the "Lens" of the Song World

Daniel Shapiro

Schubert and the World of Lieder by Daniel Shapiro
Part II.  The cycles and other important songs

Schubert: The Cycles and Other Important Songs

Daniel Shapiro

Schubert, who composed more than 600 songs, is justly known as a great melody writer. But
his music is just as full of lilting and charming (and sometimes driving) dance rhythms.
Furthermore, it his harmonies that are amazing and touching — in the way he slips, almost
magically, into an unexpected key or surprising chord. We will explore all these aspects of the
incredible Franz Peter Schubert.. Will show examples from the sonatas, and impromptus, and other short pieces”

Schubert: The Ultimate Song and Dance Man

Victor Rosenbaum

In his more than 60 Sonatas and other works for piano, Haydn demonstrates his amazing creativity and originality.  He never repeats himself, and every work shows his special genius for the unexpected .  At the same time, the works are full of an expressive and warm humanity and wonderful humor.  We will examine 4 of his Sonatas and explore how this underplayed and under-appreciated master, although not himself a virtuoso pianist, offers unique opportunities to every pianist and teacher.

The Piano Music of Haydn: A Treasure of Inexhaustible Imagination and Wit

Jeffrey Swann